/ Construction / The Deep Rock Tunnel Connector in Indianapolis Handles Wet Weather

The Deep Rock Tunnel Connector in Indianapolis Handles Wet Weather

Matt Ball on June 14, 2014 - in Construction, Corporate, Water
An electrical engineer surveys some of the newly installed cabling and conduit stretching down a new boring at the Deep Rock Tunnel Connector (DRTC) outside of Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo © Robb Williamson / AECOM

An electrical engineer surveys some of the newly installed cabling and conduit stretching down a new boring at the Deep Rock Tunnel Connector (DRTC) outside of Indianapolis, Indiana. Photo © Robb Williamson / AECOM

AECOM is responsible for providing engineering and construction management services for the Deep Rock Tunnel Connector (DRTC) outside of Indianapolis, Indiana.. At more than 250 feet below ground, the tunnel system will store more than 200 million gallons of storm water and sewage during and after wet weather, and then slowly release the flow to the wastewater treatment plant when capacity becomes available. When the project is complete, sewage overflows into Indiana waterways will be significantly reduced, and water quality will be vastly improved for the area.

The tunnel system is being built in bedrock below the city using a piece of specialized equipment called a tunnel boring machine. After the machine bores the tunnel, a concrete lining will be installed. The lining will help keep groundwater out and keep sewage in the tunnel. By using deep tunnel technology, disturbances to neighborhoods along the project route will be reduced.

Source: http://blogs.aecom.com/photoblog/2014/06/10/250-feet-under-indy/

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