/ Financial / Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to provide Wisconsin with $1 Billion in needed resilience, water equity and infrastructure assistance

Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to provide Wisconsin with $1 Billion in needed resilience, water equity and infrastructure assistance

pdubey@v1-media.com on November 23, 2021 - in Financial, News

CHICAGO – Wisconsin will see $1 billion in water infrastructure, resiliency and water equity funding, as part of the historic Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the largest long-term investment in U.S. infrastructure in nearly a century.

“For decades, water infrastructure in Wisconsin has received insufficient investment,” said Mayor Tom Barrett of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  “The American Society of Civil Engineers gave Wisconsin a C grade on its infrastructure report card and this historic infrastructure package will make life better for millions of Wisconsin residents, create a generation of good-paying union jobs and economic growth, and position the United States to win the 21st century.”

Specifically, in Wisconsin the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will:

  • Clean drinking water and lead service lines/pipes removal – Based on the traditional state revolving fund formula, Wisconsin will expect to receive $841 million over five years to improve water infrastructure across the state and ensure that clean, safe drinking water is a right in all communities.
  • Repair and rebuild bridges — Based on formula funding alone, Wisconsin would expect to receive $225 million for bridge replacement and repairs. 
  • Prepare against cyber-attacks and weather events – Based on historical formula funding levels, Wisconsin will expect to receive $20 million over five years to protect against wildfires and $18 million to protect against cyberattacks. Wisconsin residents will also benefit from the bill’s historic $3.5 billion national investment in weatherization which will reduce energy costs for families.

“This critical funding comes not a moment too soon,” said Mayor Ryan Sorenson of Sheboygan, Wisconsin.  “In July, 2021 Great Lakes mayors released survey findings showing that coastal damages from climate change will cost Wisconsin at least $245 million over the next five years, with our shoreline communities having already spent $86 million over the past two years. These figures only represent a fraction of the true need as not all shoreline jurisdictions are reflected in this figure.”

About The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative 

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative is a binational coalition of over 135 U.S. and Canadian mayors and local officials working to advance the protection and restoration of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. The Cities Initiative and local officials integrate environmental, economic and social agendas to sustain a resource that represents approximately 80% of North America’s surface freshwater supply, provides drinking water for 40 million people, and is the foundation upon which a strong regional economy is based.

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