/ Uncategorized / Supreme Court Ruling Makes it Harder for Communities to Adapt

Supreme Court Ruling Makes it Harder for Communities to Adapt

Matt Ball on June 30, 2013 - in Uncategorized

Tuesday’s Supreme Court ruling in the case Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District, the legal equivalent of a wrestling undercard, was a little bit surprising. The 5-4 ruling essentially scolded government for being overzealous in imposing requirements as conditions for permits to build. The deal the developer involved in the case was offered came down in part to a demand that he pay for wetlands restoration off-site. He refused and sued, citing two cases, Nollan v. California Coastal Commission and Dolan v. City of Tigard, that established a “rough proportionality” balancing the scope of development and public benefits — an easement for public beach access, for example. The justices basically said that in the Koontz case, the proposed burdens on the builder went too far.

While some posited that the implications were limited, others saw peril, the beginning of the end for government’s ability to exact mitigation, the kind term for making amends or patching up various impacts associated with development. Private builders are routinely asked or required to contribute into funds for affordable housing. Under the concept of value capture, the notion of compensating for government “givings” – the public investment in infrastructure, for example, that raises property values – is explicit. Cash-strapped municipalities impose impact fees and other charges that reflect this basic idea: build, but make a contribution to the greater good. Other countries are much stricter about this than we are.

Read more via Atlantic Cities

Matt Ball

About Matt Ball

Matt Ball is founder and editorial director of V1 Media, publisher of Informed Infrastructure, Earth Imaging Journal, Sensors & Systems, Asian Surveying & Mapping and the video news site GeoSpatial Stream.

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